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The Things I Carry

Medical students wear short white coats, and during our clinical years we quickly discover that the pockets of our white coats can be truly lifesaving. Maybe white coat pockets could be best compared to a purse, because we tend to carry lots and lots of helpful things, sometimes to the point of excess. Residents and attending physicians chuckle at the pure volume of stuff that a medical student can cram into their white coat pockets. We move throughout the hospital so often that if we don’t carry something with us, we may not have the opportunity to get it again until the very end of the work day. From quick clinical references to granola bars for the times when we miss lunch, here is a peek into the many things that I carried over the course of my 3rd year: Continue Reading →

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Patience for Patients

Everyone in the world has heard the cliché statement that patience is a virtue. It is the bread and butter of all desirable traits, of all admired characteristics, of all necessary and pertinent qualities that are essential for us as aspiring physicians. It is, simply, an essential attribute that rewards us with persistence. This persistence is vital in helping us continue on the journey toward becoming a medical doctor- life-saver and friend.

Patience. Continue Reading →

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Our New Editor: M2 Caitlin Li

We’re happy to announce our new editor for the 2016-2017 academic year: M2 Caitlin Li. She was a regular contributor last year (read a couple of her posts here and here) and will now be at the helm. Read a little bit about her:

Name, age, hometown

My name’s Caitlin Linglong Li. I’m 21 years old, and I was born in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

College attended, major, minor (if applicable)

I am a proud graduate of Vanderbilt University. I majored in biomedical engineering, and did my senior project on a video game-like simulation training program for NICU residents. Continue Reading →

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A Different Kind of Ice Bucket Challenge

We’re nearing the two-year anniversary of that time when countless videos flooded your social media feed of people dumping buckets of ice water on themselves—the Ice Bucket Challenge, it was called—all to raise awareness for a disease called ALS, otherwise known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. You may have even participated in the challenge, as my medical school did. I remember the afternoon prepping for it. My inner junior-high boy came out in full force, trying to scavenge around the house for the biggest “bucket” I could find. Because, of course, if I was going to do this, I needed to do it right: with as much freezing-cold water as I could somewhat reasonably dump over my head. I searched the house high and low. I needed something big. “We’ve got a large mixing bowl in the kitchen,” I thought. Bigger. “I could use that cleaning bucket under the sink.” BIG. GER. “The trash can. Perfect.” Yes, I emptied (and cleaned) my trash can and filled it all the way with ice and water. Even threw a little salt in there to make it super cold. I lined up with my colleagues, and one-by-one in wave-like fashion we proceeded to pour the contents of our buckets over ourselves. Continue Reading →

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A Reflection from a Brand New Medical Student

On Monday, 104 excited, albeit anxious, students woke up, got dressed, and headed out their doors, off to medical school orientation. As one of those lucky students, thinking about starting medical school brings a range of emotions: from ecstatic, to overwhelmed, to nervous and many more in-between. Continue Reading →

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What I Love About Working in Student Affairs

Growing up I had always thought I would end up in a health-related field.  After realizing I am squeamish around vomit, pass out when blood is being taken and generally can’t stomach the sight of broken bones, I knew becoming a physician wasn’t for me. Although the intrigue of the field was the ability to help empower individuals to help themselves. Continue Reading →

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M1 Reflections: Part 3

Part 3 of M1 Reflections! Here’s Parts 1 and 2, in case you missed them. Thanks to M1 Caitlin Li for compiling these, and don’t miss her conclusion at the end. Continue Reading →

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M1 Reflections: Part 2

Here’s the second post of the M1 Reflections series (and here’s Part 1 in case you missed it). Again, thanks to M1 Caitlin Li for compiling these.

We made it! We, the Class of 2019, the first full class of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, have completed our first year of medical school. In celebration of our achievement and progress, I have asked some of my fellow classmates to share their reflections on this past year. Continue Reading →

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M1 Reflections: Part 1

The following post is part one of a series about M1 reflections. Thanks to M1 Caitlin Li for compiling these!

We made it! We, the Class of 2019, the first full class of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, have completed our first year of medical school. In celebration of our achievement and progress, I have asked some of my fellow classmates to share their reflections on this past year.
Continue Reading →

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Storytelling

Sometimes I get questions about why I don’t write more on the blog about patients I’ve encountered during this third year of medical clerkships and clinical experience. Honestly, it’s a question that’s hard to answer, as it took me a while to really put my finger on why exactly I don’t want to do that. Obviously, there’s patient privacy and HIPAA to worry about, but I think there’s more than that.

You see, there are so many amazing, heartbreaking, beautiful, crazy, and hopeful stories that I’ve heard and experienced over the course of the past year. Stories about broken marriages and mental health crises; stories about living alone and not being able to breathe; stories about kids trying out for the school football team for the first time; stories about the scary heartbeat that turned out to be not so scary. The list of stories I have heard is, well, enormous. Continue Reading →