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Be Courageous and Have Heart

The unspoken.
The monster under the bed.

The unspoken.
The shadow in the corner.  Continue Reading →

GHS Community Health Summit

On April 8, 2017, Greenville Health System hosted the 11th Annual Minority Health Summit (now known as the Community Health Summit). The Summit is a yearly health education initiative held during National Minority Health Awareness Month. The Summit’s purpose is “to educate and increase awareness of major health disparities that disproportionately affect the lives of minorities in our community.” This special day featured keynote speaker Tajh Boyd, healthy lifestyle presentations, health-risk assessments, physician-led talks on diabetes and mental health, and powerful survivor stories and testimonials. I had the privilege of attending the event and got to meet and share stories with people aged 12-100 (seriously, I took a 100-year-old woman’s blood pressure, and it was better than mine!).
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To Dean Douglas

To Dean Douglas: medic, instructor, volunteer, father, husband and friend. With so many commemorating your extraordinary life in service, one can’t help but think of the countless times you honored those who went before you with the bagpipes you played so well.

Two years ago, when my medical school class gathered to honor those who had donated their bodies for our learning, you agreed to play for our procession. You said you were honored to watch us pay tribute with our music, our words, and our art. So today I use my words to pay tribute to you.

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Much More Will Be Required

Before fourth-year student Jeremiah White ever started medical school, he wrote this post about the moment he knew he wanted to be a doctor. Fast forward four years later and Jeremiah is about to become a physician, and he recently found out his residency placement in emergency medicine. Read below about his emotions on Match Day and his thoughts about his future as a doctor:

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The Road to Cynicism: Remembering our Privilege

A couple years ago, I wrote about the privilege of becoming a physician. When I wrote that, I was still far removed from the clinical environment. I did not have a true appreciation for the complexities of everyday life in the hospital. I wrote that as aspiring physicians it is imperative for us to not be owned by our privilege but to instead esteem our work as the highest privilege. These facts have remained unchanged in my mind, but I have now come to face the challenges of maintaining such an attitude and posture.
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Light Through Darkness

Like many aspiring physicians across the country, I came into medical school with high expectations for the quality of care I wanted to give my future patients. I envisioned bringing a patient back from the edge of death in the trauma bay or performing life-saving surgery on a young child with cancer. I would do it all with a smile on my face and an open heart – yearning to love people relentlessly and sacrifice a bit of myself for patients in desperate need of care. Now, in my last year of medical school, this vision of myself in medicine still persists, yet has been tested regularly.

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An Open Letter to the Standardized Patient

As part of their educational training, students at the USC School of Medicine Greenville experience encounters with standardized patients, or trained individuals who portray the roles of patients or family members. Students are able to develop and practice communication and physical exam skills, as well as foster a greater understanding of the importance of the “big picture” of a patient’s medical history. Below is a thank you note from M2 Anna Tarasidis for the many wonderful standardized patients that have been an integral part of our students’ education. The Standardized Patient Program is a service of the Greenville HealthCare Simulation Center.

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Lessons from a Fire Station

One of my favorite aspects of attending the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville (USCSOMG) consists of riding with medics on ambulances once a month, a required part of our preclinical curriculum. As I plan on pursuing an Emergency Medicine residency, this unique part of our training affords me the unique opportunity to visit patients in their home environment, a facet of their lives that most physicians, and healthcare providers, are never made privy to.

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On Wearing a White Coat

It is a privilege to wear a white coat. It is a universal sign of care and the advocacy of total wellness. The receipt of my white coat was, undoubtedly, an experience that I will treasure for the rest of my life. However, I had no idea that those feelings could be rivaled, let alone beat. This happened for the first time in the hospital when the emotions I experienced after wearing my white coat left an unparalleled mark on my heart. The trust that other medical professionals had in my intent was evident as my path and aim was never questioned. The assurance patients and their family members had in me was awe-inspiring and propelled me to use poetry as the paintbrush to illustrate a portrait of my experience.
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On Presence

To be present – what does it mean? How do we arrive to it? How do we yield it as a necessary tool in our future practice?

We find comfort in the things we can control, bury ourselves in the the areas that we feel competent in, garnering false strength and validations that serve to fuel us. We focus more on getting things checked off our list and being a well-oiled machine than being present – all mind, body, and soul dedicated in a moment which is fleeting and unrecoverable.
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