….What Brings Us Together Today

Welcome back everyone!

Alright, you can admit it.  How many of you, after reading that title, just conjured up an image of a small gray haired man in full bishop’s regalia (hat and all)?  Turning sanctimoniously towards the crowd he announces, with impressive nasality, “Mawwage.  Mawwage is what brings us together today.” (A classic Princess Bride scene for those currently staring quizzically at the screen).

That was certainly true for much of the med student population of Greenville.  Freed from the obligation opportunity of togetherness that comes with beloved 8 a.m. lectures, our student body scattered across the globe.  Mountains were conquered and valleys traversed on hiking and biking expeditions.  National parks explored and beaches enjoyed, summer was as relaxing as kicking back in a hammock and as challenging as medical volunteering across multiple continents.  In the midst of all that adventuring, time was made for reunion and celebration, the bringing together of friends, family and fellow students that comes with marriage.

Alas, the long days of summer eventually fade into the august twilight, bringing the return of those infamous lectures (or rotations).  Once again, the students of USC SOM Greenville have been brought together, refreshed by summer and invigorated by the addition of a new class.  While at different points in our journey, we convene united by a common pursuit: learning the delicate art and complex science that is practicing medicine.

As a managing editor of Transforming Medical School, I’m excited to welcome you back for another year of stories from this formative journey that is medical education.  We’d love to hear any comments, questions, or suggestions from our readers.  In the meantime, look forward to the return of regular writing from our blog team as this new year kicks off.

 


 

Ben DeMarco

Ben DeMarco

I grew up in the small Pee Dee town of Marion, South Carolina, before heading up to Durham, North Carolina, for an undergraduate education (and a few basketball games) at Duke University. After a year working in community health at Duke, I was primed to begin the study of medicine. USC School of Medicine Greenville’s attention to communities and commitment to teamwork brought me back to South Carolina (the amazing facilities didn’t hurt either). I’m interested in primary care and thinking about how physicians’ moral frameworks affect their practice of medicine. Most of all, I’m excited to be part of this new school and look forward to reflecting together with my classmates as we make our way through these formative years.

Start the conversation